#SaveFulbright: America, don’t cut Fulbright!

UPDATE: There is now a movement and petition to #SaveFulbright. Visit SaveFulbright.org now to do your part! Thank you!

For some of the Korean students I teach, I am the first American they have ever met in person, let alone interacted with on a regular basis. From  convincing my students that some Americans indeed do like spicy food to larger discussions about diversity and equality, I’ve been able to engage in ways that offer a critical and complex view of the world around us. I’ve learned a lot about Korea and Korean culture and have been able to share my knowledge with friends, family, and acquaintances back in the USA thanks to Fulbright.

The Fulbright Program is one of the best opportunities that America has to improve its relationship with the rest of the world. Instead of being bogged down in high-level diplomatic talks and lofty statements by politicians, Fulbrighters work to make a direct person-to-person impact. While there are other educational exchange programs that exist, Fulbright’s rich history and success has left an important mark with people around the world.

That’s why I want to talk to you about the recent budget proposal by the Obama administration to cut the Fulbright Program by $30 million.

The Fulbright Program’s current budget is $235 million per year. The proposed cuts represent 13% of the budget for the program. Worse, the administration has provided no plan for how the cuts would be implemented and which countries that they would impact.

We can’t afford to cut the Fulbright Program. No other program has such an established worldwide reputation; it is the gold standard in international educational exchange. It’s not just for Americans; the Fulbright program offers thousands of people from foreign countries the chance to teach and research in the United States each year.

Please, write Congress now and tell them that the impact of Fulbrighters around the world. Tell Congress that a $30 million cut is not acceptable.

Over 300,000 people have been able to learn about other cultures and exchange knowledge around the world because of the Fulbright Program. By allowing these massive cuts, we’re starting a down a slippery slope that leads towards more cuts in the future and ultimately threatens the existence of Fulbright as we know it.

Senator J. William Fulbright said that “educational exchange is not merely one of those nice but marginal activities in which we engage in international affairs, but rather, from the standpoint of future world peace and order, probably the most important and potentially rewarding of our foreign-policy activities.”

Together, we can send a strong message to Congress that the American people support the ideals of Senator Fulbright. In just 5 minutes, you can tell our elected officials that international educational exchange is vital to America’s foreign policy.

I’ve got about four months left in my grant year and I’m savoring every moment. Let’s make sure that the same number of people get this opportunity next year. Please, show your support for the Fulbright Program by tweeting or posting on Facebook using the hashtag #SaveFulbright.

Most sincerely,

Jonathan Rice
Fulbright ETA, South Korea 2013-14

If you want to learn the details about the proposed cuts, check out more information courtesy of the Austrian Fulbright Commission: http://www.fulbright.at/save-fulbright-lobby-2015.html

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About Jonathan Rice

Fulbright Fellow, Pitzer College alum, and communicator passionate about telling stories that make an impact.

Posted on 03/16/2014, in Fulbright South Korea 2013-14 and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. Reblogged this on Adventures in the North Pacific and commented:
    The Obama Administration is planning on cutting the Fulbright Program. Here’s why this is a bad decision — and what we can do to stop it — written by fellow Korea Fulbright ETA Jon Rice.

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